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Accreditations
ASWB 1112
CCAPP 2N-04-866-0223
CAADE CP20 950 H 1217
NAADAC 84902
NBCC 6202
NYSED Board of Social Work - SW-0436
NYSED Board of Licensed Mental Health Counselors - MHC-0201
NYSED Board of Psychology - PSY-0045
Available Courses


This 4 credit course is designed for social workers, psychologists, counselors, therapists, nurses and other health care professionals, and is at the intermediate instructional level.

There is no known conflict of interest or commercial support related to this CE program.

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common pediatric neurobehavioral disorder often treated in the primary care setting. This systematic review updates and extends two previous Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) systematic evidence reviews and focuses on the comparative effectiveness of methods to establish the diagnosis of ADHD, updates the comparative effectiveness of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatments, and evaluates different monitoring strategies in the primary care setting for individuals from birth through 17 years of age.

Learning Objectives

After completing this training the professional will be able to:
  1. describe the process used to evaluate the Strength of Evidence (SOE) for studies included in the 2018 Comparative Effectiveness Review Number 203 comparing strategies to diagnose, treat and monitor children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
  2. list a variety of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments used for children with ADHD and describe the findings for studies related to these treatments.
  3. identify key messages of the 2018 Comparative Effectiveness Review Number 203 comparing strategies to diagnose, treat and monitor children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).


This 3 credit course is designed for social workers, psychologists, counselors, therapists, nurses and other health care professionals, and is at the intermediate instructional level.

There is no known conflict of interest or commercial support related to this CE program.

Course Description

This document is intended to provide counseling and related professionals with competencies for working with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Queer, Intersex, Questioning and Ally (LGBQIQA) individuals, groups, and communities. The aim of these competencies is to provide a framework for creating safe, supportive, and caring relationships with LGBQIQA individuals, groups, and communities that foster self-acceptance and personal, social, emotional, and relational development.

Learning Objectives

After completing this training the professional will:
  • Describe competencies for counseling with lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer, questioning, intersex and ally Individuals.
  • Describe competencies for counseling allies.
  • Summarize competencies for counseling people who are intersex.
  • Define terms important to understanding lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer, questioning, intersex and ally Individuals.


This 2 credit course is designed for social workers, psychologists, counselors, therapists, nurses and other health care professionals, and is at the intermediate instructional level.

There is no known conflict of interest or commercial support related to this CE program.

Course Description

Cyberbullying has emotional and psychological consequences on youth and some adults. This courses focuses on consequences, identification, prevention and responses. Issues related to cyberbullying and sexual orientation are also addressed. Course material from the Cyberbullying Research Center.

Learning Objectives

After completing this training the professional will:
  • Outline consequences of cyberbullying.
  • Describe options for the identification and prevention of cyberbullying and responses to it.
  • Summarize information regarding cyberbullying and sexual orientation.


This 2 credit course is designed for social workers, psychologists, counselors, therapists, nurses and other health care professionals, and is at the intermediate instructional level.

Dr. Miller and the ICCE receive compensation through the sales of this manual. There is no outside commercial support related to this CE program and no known conflict of interest.

This manual explains how to measure clinical change in psychotherapy,
and how to use statistics to understand outcome data. Guidelines are
provided for statistical formulas and outcome reporting. The Manual
provides examples based on the Session Rating Scale (SRS) and
Outcome Rating Scale (ORS), but also pertains to other therapeutic
alliance and outcome measures.

Bertolino, B., & Miller, S.D. (Eds.) (2013). The ICCE Feedback Informed Treatment manuals (Volumes 1-6). Chicago, IL: ICCE Press.

Learning Objectives

After completing this training the health care professional will be able to:
  • Establish a valid baseline in psychotherapy (the basics of validity and reliability, and how they pertain to choice of instrument and the administration of outcome measures).
  • Graph client results (guidelines and methods for displaying outcome data for clinical use).
  • Articulate clinical significance.
  • Utilize effect size and expected trajectories of change.
1 CE credit hours
$5.50   

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This 1 credit course is designed for social workers, psychologists, counselors, therapists, nurses and other health care professionals, and is at the intermediate instructional level.

There is no known conflict of interest or commercial support related to this CE program.

Since they were developed and tested back in the late 90’s, the Outcome and Session Rating Scales have been downloaded by practitioners more than 100,000 times!  Judging by the number of cases entered into the three authorized software applications, the tools have been used inform service delivery for millions of clients seeking care for different problems in diverse treatment settings.  The number of booksmanuals, and “how to” videos describing how to use the tools has continued to grow dramatically.  Few practitioners get the chance to address specific questions related to their use of the measures in daily clinical work.

In this hour-long webinar, answers are provided to the most common question beginning and intermediate users have regarding feedback-informed treatment. The emerging area of deliberate practice – an evidence-based approach to professional development is also introduced.

A simple, valid, and reliable alternative exists for maximizing the effectiveness and efficiency of treatment based on using ongoing feedback to empirically tailor services to the individual client needs and characteristics. This approach is known in the literature as routine outcome monitoring), or ROM. ROM is the core of the more comprehensive Feedback Informed Treatment approach, and this training provides an introductory presentation of Feedback Informed Treatment (FIT) and Deliberate Practice, and answers common questions about the approaches.

Participants are exposed to the critical role of alliance building skills that cut across different therapeutic orientations and diverse client populations, and are known to impact therapy

In addition, participants learn nuances of using outcome management tools (ORS, SRS) to inform and improve treatment, and to specifically use the Session Rating Scale (SRS) and the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS) The training addresses some of the empirical foundations of Feedback Informed Treatment and Deliberate Practice. Therapists are exposed to methods and attitudes for creating a culture within their own practices and agencies that utilizes outcome and alliance feedback to effectively impact therapy and client outcomes.

Finally, Deliberate Practice is delineated from Feedback Informed Treatment, and their integration is described. Currently known principles and practices of Deliberate Practice are outlined for participants. Applying and integrating FIT and Deliberate Practice into clinical practice is discussed.

Learning Objectives

After completing this training the professional will be able to:
  1. Apply FIT and Deliberate Practice in clinical practice.
  2. Utilize feedback to positively impact client outcomes.
  3. Describe how to analyze outcome and alliance data accurately.
  4. Define deliberate practice and how to apply it for improving therapist effectiveness


This 1 credit course is designed for social workers, psychologists, counselors, therapists, nurses and other health care professionals, and is at the intermediate instructional level.

There is no known conflict of interest or commercial support related to this CE program.

In this second, hour-long webinar, clinicians from around the world meet to have their questions answered regarding feedback-informed treatment and deliberate practice.

A simple, valid, and reliable alternative exists for maximizing the effectiveness and efficiency of treatment based on using ongoing feedback to empirically tailor services to the individual client needs and characteristics. This approach is known in the literature as routine outcome monitoring), or ROM. ROM is the core of the more comprehensive Feedback Informed Treatment approach, and this training provides an introductory presentation of Feedback Informed Treatment (FIT) and Deliberate Practice, and answers common questions about the approaches.

The training addresses basic empirical foundations of Feedback Informed Treatment. Participants are exposed to the critical role of alliance building and flexibility skills that cut across different therapeutic orientations and diverse client populations, and are known to impact therapy outcomes. In addition, participants learn nuances of using outcome management tools (ORS, SRS) to inform and improve treatment, and to specifically use the Session Rating Scale (SRS) and the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS).

Participants are exposed to empirical evidence regarding the effects of supervision on supervisee ‘s client’s outcomes Alternate approaches to supervision are outlined, with a focus on improving supervisee effectiveness regarding client outcomes. Rationale and tips regarding specific role of video analysis in deliberate practice are provided.

Deliberate Practice is delineated from Feedback Informed Treatment, and their integration is described (including a focus on improvement via therapeutic factors. Currently known principles and practices of Deliberate Practice are outlined for participants. The use of Feedback Informed Treatment and Deliberate Practice with other approaches and treatment protocols is outlined and delineated.

Learning Objectives

After completing this training the professional will be able to:
  1. To apply the principles of deliberate practice in supervision, to the mastery of FIT, and their individual professional development.
  2. Explain and address client feedback on the ORS and SRS.
  3. Identify rationale and tips for including video analysis of therapy sessions in deliberate practice.
  4. Describe how to combine FIT with other approaches and treatment protocols.


This 1 credit course is designed for social workers, psychologists, counselors, therapists, nurses and other health care professionals, and is at the intermediate instructional level.

There is no known conflict of interest or commercial support related to this CE program.

The third in a series of hour-long webinars answer clinicians’ questions about feedback-informed treatment and deliberate practice, two evidence-based methods for improving therapeutic effectiveness.

A simple, valid, and reliable alternative exists for maximizing the effectiveness and efficiency of treatment based on using ongoing feedback to empirically tailor services to the individual client needs and characteristics. This approach is known in the literature as routine outcome monitoring), or ROM. ROM is the core of the more comprehensive Feedback Informed Treatment approach, and this training provides an introductory presentation of Feedback Informed Treatment (FIT) and Deliberate Practice, and answers common questions about the approaches.

The training addresses basic empirical foundations of Feedback Informed Treatment. Participants are exposed to the critical role of alliance building and flexibility skills that cut across different therapeutic orientations and diverse client populations, and are known to impact therapy outcomes.

In addition, participants learn nuances of using outcome management tools (ORS, SRS) to inform and improve treatment, and to specifically use the Session Rating Scale (SRS) and the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS) create a culture of feedback, including a focus on the meaning and relevance of clinical cutoff scores, and the meaning of the various “performance metrics” reported in the authorized software systems. Participants learn about the administration and uses of the Group Session Rating Scale.

Deliberate Practice is delineated from Feedback Informed Treatment, and their use in clinical practice is discussed, including a focus on improvement via therapeutic factors. Currently known principles and practices of Deliberate Practice are outlined for participants.

Learning Objectives

After completing this training the professional will be able to:
  1. Describe the meaning and relevance of the clinical cutoff on the ORS.
  2. Outline the meaning of the various “performance metrics” reported in the authorized software systems.
  3. Administer the Group Session Rating Scale with fidelity.
  4. Describe how FIT and deliberate practice can be used to improve therapeutic effectiveness.


This 12 credit course is designed for social workers, psychologists, counselors, therapists, nurses and other health care professionals, and is at the intermediate instructional level.

There is no known conflict of interest or commercial support related to this CE program.

This credit course is designed for social workers, psychologists, counselors, therapists, nurses and other health care professionals, and is at the intermediate instructional level.

There is no known conflict of interest or commercial support related to this CE program

THIS IS A LIVE ON SITE PROGRAM

See this page for details: https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/deliberate-practice-intensive-2020-tickets-79935161219

The Deliberate Practice Intensive Training will be held in Chicago, Illinois (USA) August 13 and 14, 2020. Join Dr. Scott Miller and his team for 2 intensive days focused on deliberate practice strategies designed to improve clinician outcomes.

Professional development is central to lifelong job satisfaction. Traditional approaches (e.g., lectures, clinical experience, even supervision) don’t work. The latest studies show that unlocking one’s potential as a therapist requires “deliberate practice.” At this intensive training facilitated by Scott Miller Ph.D. and his team, cutting edge research will be translated into highly individualized, step-by-step instructions for improving your clinical performance and effectiveness. Due to the intensive nature of this training, registration is limited. Join this select group of colleagues from around the world for 2 demanding, and yet inspiring days.

Through a combination of didactic presentations, analysis of individual outcome data, skill building drills, personalized feedback, and deep reflection, the Deliberate Practice Intensive is designed to enhance your therapeutic skills and effectiveness with the most challenging and difficult clinical scenarios and clients.

Learning Objectives

After completing this training the health professional will be able to:
  • outline step-by-step instructions for improving my clinical performance and effectiveness
  • summarize strategies to raise one's effectiveness level
  • describe strategies to improve one's ability to engage, retain, and help a more diverse clientele
  • develop and sustain a lifelong, professional development plan.
2 CE credit hours
$11.00   

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This 2 credit course is designed for social workers, psychologists, counselors, therapists, nurses and other health care professionals, and is at the intermediate instructional level.

Dr. Miller and the ICCE receive compensation through the sales of this manual. There is no outside commercial support related to this CE program and no known conflict of interest.

In this manual, the basics of implementing Feedback-Informed
Treatment are described and illustrated through case examples and
scripts. The manual details how to introduce the Outcome Rating Scale
(ORS) and the Session Rating Scale (SRS) in clinical work and how
to integrate it as part of ongoing treatment to improve the outcome of
service.

Bertolino, B., & Miller, S.D. (Eds.) (2013). The ICCE Feedback Informed Treatment manuals (Volumes 1-6). Chicago, IL: ICCE Press.
rning Objectives

After completing this training the health care professional will be able to:
  • Describe the specific components of routine outcome measurement
  • Use outcome and alliance measurement instruments in routine clinical care
  • Identify important factors in creating a culture for measuring client outcomes and using feedback processes
  • Describe strategies for using feedback to inform and improve care on a routine and ongoing basis


This 2 credit course is designed for social workers, psychologists, counselors, therapists, nurses and other health care professionals, and is at the intermediate instructional level.

Dr. Miller and the ICCE receive compensation through the sales of this manual. There is no outside commercial support related to this CE program and no known conflict of interest.

The purpose of this manual is to provide readers with an easy to follow, practical g

Bertolino, B., & Miller, S.D. (Eds.) (2013). The ICCE Feedback Informed Treatment manuals (Volumes 1-6). Chicago, IL: ICCE Press.uide for incorporating Feedback-Informed Treatment (FIT) in work with specific populations and across different service settings. While the material is organized around the use of the Outcome and Session Rating Scales (ORS & SRS), the principles and practices covered are transferable when outcome (e.g., Outcome Questionnaire 45.2 [OQ 45.2], Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation [CORE]) and alliance measures (e.g., Working Alliance Inventory [WAI]) are used to inform and improve clinical work with specific groups or service delivery systems.

Learning Objectives

After completing this training the health care professional will be able to:
  • Use routine outcome measurement in group settings.
  • Apply FIT with a number of special populations.
  • Applying FIT in specific service settings.
  • Apply skills of deliberate practice to continuously improve clinical skills and effectiveness.


This 2.50 credit course is designed for social workers, psychologists, counselors, therapists, nurses and other health care professionals, and is at the intermediate instructional level.

Dr. Miller and the ICCE receive compensation through the sales of this manual. There is no outside commercial support related to this CE program and no known conflict of interest.

In this manual the implementation of Feedback-
Informed Treatment (FIT) in agencies and
healthcare systems is explored. The objective is to
guide organizational staff through the process of
implementation. Practical strategies will be provided
for each stage, including: preparation, planning, and
sustainability. This manual also includes exploration
and discussion of potential challenges as well as
suggestions for resolving the most common difficulties
encountered when implementing FIT in real world
clinical settings.

Bertolino, B., & Miller, S.D. (Eds.) (2013). The ICCE Feedback Informed Treatment manuals (Volumes 1-6). Chicago, IL: ICCE Press.

Learning Objectives

After completing this training the health care professional will be able to:
  • Describe the process of agency implementation of FIT
  • Describe the exploration phase
  • Describe the installation phase
  • Describe the initial implementation phase
  • Describe full agency implementation of FIT


This 3 credit course is designed for social workers, psychologists, counselors, therapists, nurses and other health care professionals, and is at the intermediate instructional level.

There is no known conflict of interest or commercial support related to this CE program.

Most people with alcohol and other drug (AOD) use disorders suffer from co-occurring disorders (CODs), including mental health and medical problems, which complicate treatment and may contribute to poorer outcomes. This course addresses existing models for treating CODs at the treatment and the systems levels. Barriers that impede further integration of care for patients with CODs are addressed. The development of co-morbid anxiety and alcohol use disorders is explored, as well as evidence regarding treatment approaches for these common CODs.

Learning Objectives

After completing this training the professional will:
  • identify a variety of models for treating co-occurring disorders.
  • describe barriers to coordinated or integrated care for CODs.
  • describe the evidence regarding the development of co-morbid anxiety and alcohol use disorders.
  • summarize evidence for a variety of treatments for anxiety and alcohol use disorders.


This 1 credit course is designed for social workers, psychologists, counselors, therapists, nurses and other health care professionals, and is at the intermediate instructional level.

There is no known conflict of interest or commercial support related to this CE program.

This course examines the results of a survey about mindfulness competencies in the area of counseling and psychotherapy. It specifically addresses competencies needed for training clients in the use of mindfulness methods. Recommendations are offered about mindfulness practice for counselor preparation, cultural competency, continuing education, clinical applications, and questions for future research.

Learning Objectives

After completing this training the professional will:
  • identify mindfulness competencies for counselors and psychotherapists as identified by mindfulness practitioners.
  • describe how mindfulness competencies can inform mindfulness training with clients.


This 1 credit course is designed for social workers, psychologists, counselors, therapists, nurses and other health care professionals, and is at the intermediate instructional level.

There is no known conflict of interest or commercial support related to this CE program.

This credit course is designed for social workers, psychologists, counselors, therapists, nurses and other health care professionals, and is at the intermediate instructional level.

The first author (ELG) developed the Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement (MORE) intervention, and has received income from the MORE treatment manual (Garland, 2013) and therapist trainings.

Contemporary advances in addiction neuroscience have paralleled increasing interest in the ancient mental training practice of mindfulness meditation as a potential therapy for addiction. In the past decade, mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) have been studied as a treatment for an array addictive behaviors, including drinking, smoking, opioid misuse, and use of illicit substances like cocaine and heroin. This article reviews current research evaluating MBIs as a treatment for addiction, with a focus on findings pertaining to clinical outcomes and biobehavioral mechanisms. Studies indicate that MBIs reduce substance misuse and craving by modulating cognitive, affective, and psychophysiological processes integral to self-regulation and reward processing. This integrative review provides the basis for manifold recommendations regarding the next wave of research needed to firmly establish the efficacy of MBIs and elucidate the mechanistic pathways by which these therapies ameliorate addiction. Issues pertaining to MBI treatment optimization and sequencing, dissemination and implementation, dose–response relationships, and research rigor and reproducibility are discussed.

Learning Objectives

After completing this training the professional will be able to:
  1. describe the potential neurocognitive processes that become dysregulated due to addiction and may be improved through MBIs
  2. outline the current state of research regarding clinical outcomes of mindfulness-based treatment for addiction
  3. compile a list of recommendations for future research related to mindfulness-based treatment for addiction
1 CE credit hours
$6.00   

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This 1 credit course is designed for social workers, psychologists, counselors, therapists, nurses and other health care professionals, and is at the intermediate instructional level.

There is no known conflict of interest or commercial support related to this CE program.

Course Description

This course explores the unique cultures of the military and provides civilian mental health clinicians with a better understanding of cultural factors. It provides suggestions for adapting civilian clinical services to meet the needs of military service members, veterans, and their families. It also addresses how civilian communities can better support the needs of military service members, veterans, and their families. Note: Course includes a helpful glossary of terms and acronyms (page 79).

Learning Objectives

After completing this training the professional will:
  • Describe aspects of military culture.
  • Identify ways that civilian clinicians can make adaptations to work with military service members, veterans, and families.
  • Describe ways to build community capacity to enhance civilian-based services to service members, veterans, and families.
4 CE credit hours
$25.00   

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This 4 credit course is designed for social workers, psychologists, counselors, therapists, nurses and other health care professionals, and is at the intermediate instructional level.

There is no known conflict of interest or commercial support related to this CE program.

Course Description

In the past, maladaptations after trauma were considered to be a reflection of personal weaknesses and were stigmatized.

This course uses recent evidence to understand physiological responses to severe stress and trauma and the risk factors for a pathological response to trauma. These gains in understanding come from the study of memory and neuro-hormonal reactivity and control systems.

The course also summarizes current biologically-informed, psychotherapeutic and pharmacologic interventions for the prevention and treatment of acute stress disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Learning Objectives

After completing this training the professional will:
  • Describe physiological responses to severe stress and trauma and the the risk factors for a pathological response to trauma.
  • Summarize current biologically-informed, psychotherapeutic and pharmacologic interventions for the prevention and treatment of acute stress disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
4 CE credit hours
$25.00   

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This 4 credit course is designed for social workers, psychologists, counselors, therapists, nurses and other health care professionals, and is at the intermediate instructional level.

There is no known conflict of interest or commercial support related to this CE program.

Course Description

The Relapse Prevention (RP) model has been a mainstay of addictions theory and treatment since its introduction three decades ago. This course provides an overview and update of RP for addictive behaviors with a focus on developments over the last decade (2000-2010). Major treatment outcome studies and meta-analyses are summarized, as are selected empirical findings relevant to the tenets of the RP model. Notable advances in RP in the last decade include the introduction of a reformulated cognitive-behavioral model of relapse and the development of mindfulness-based relapse prevention. Also reviewed is the emergent literature on genetic correlates of relapse following pharmacological and behavioral treatments.

Learning Objectives

After completing this training the professional will:
  • Identify developments in relapse prevention from 2000-2010.
  • Summarize the impact of relapse prevention approaches on a variety of clinical factors.
  • Describe mindfulness-based relapse prevention.
  • Describe genetic and neurological influences on treatment response and relapse.
10 CE credit hours
$62.50   

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This 10 credit course is designed for social workers, psychologists, counselors, therapists, nurses and other health care professionals, and is at the intermediate instructional level.

There is no known conflict of interest or commercial support related to this CE program.

This course provides an overview of numerous aspects of solution focused therapy including process, ingredients, session structure and specific instructions. It also covers the application of solution focused therapy to anxiety management.

Learning Objectives

After completing this training the professional will:
  • describe the process and ingredients of SFT.
  • outline session structure of SFT.
  • identify specific instructions from SFT.
  • outline possible applications of SFT to anxiety management.


This 1 credit course is designed for social workers, psychologists, counselors, therapists, nurses and other health care professionals, and is at the intermediate instructional level.

There is no known conflict of interest or commercial support related to this CE program.

Course Description

The projected increase of substance use problems among older adults suggests a need for heightened awareness among clinical mental health counselors as they treat this population. This article (a) discusses the prevalence, vulnerabilities, and consequences of misuse and abuse of alcohol, prescription drugs, and illicit substances; b) reviews age-specific counseling considerations and approaches to assessment, diagnosis, and intervention; and (c) calls for more attention to the subject in training and research.

Learning Objectives

After completing this training the professional will:
  • Describe the prevalence, vulnerabilities, and consequences of misuse and abuse of alcohol, prescription drugs, and illicit substances among older adults.
  • Identify counseling considerations and approaches to assessment, diagnosis, and intervention for older adults with substance use disorders.


This 1 credit course is designed for social workers, psychologists, counselors, therapists, nurses and other health care professionals, and is at the intermediate instructional level.

There is no known conflict of interest or commercial support related to this CE program.

This course focuses on two relevant articles regarding the understanding and treatment of PTSD.

In recent years, compelling evidence has emerged that PTSD+DS represents a distinct clinical population with distinct neurobiological and epidemiological features. This course will summarize the existing literature on the unique features of this subpopulation. It will also describe implications for treatment and future directions for research.

Additionally, this course will examine shared decision-making interventions for PTSD and the use of shared decision-making for PTSD in clinical practice.

Learning Objectives

After completing this training the professional will be able to:
  1. Summarize the correlates of the dissociative subtypes of PTSD
  2. Summarize the neurobiological correlates of the dissociative subtype of PTSD
  3. Identify treatment implications when dissociation accompanies PTSD
  4. Describe shared decision-making interventions for working with clients with PTSD
  5. Summarize the benefits of shared decision-making interventions for PTSD


This 2 credit course is designed for social workers, psychologists, counselors, therapists, nurses and other health care professionals, and is at the intermediate instructional level.

There is no known conflict of interest or commercial support related to this CE program.

Course Description

This course explores research and practice on trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy, which is an evidence-based treatment approach shown to help children, adolescents, and their caregivers overcome trauma-related difficulties. The course also provides an understanding of the effects of maltreatment on brain development.

Learning Objectives

After completing this training the professional will:
  • Summarize the effects of maltreatment on brain development.
  • Describe trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy for children affected by sexual abuse or trauma.
  • Describe the evidence regarding TF-CBT.


This 2 credit course is designed for social workers, psychologists, counselors, therapists, nurses and other health care professionals, and is at the intermediate instructional level.

There is no known conflict of interest or commercial support related to this CE program.

This course provides behavioral health clinicians with a comparative effectiveness review of the evidence for drug and nondrug interventions in treating acute symptoms associated with bipolar disorder (BD) and preventing relapse.

Learning Objectives

After completing this training the professional will be able to:
  1. describe the process of selecting studies to be included in this Comparative Effectiveness Review.
  2. outline the results of studies examining the effect of psychosocial and other non-drug Interventions for Bipolar Disorder (BD), and utilize this evidence in treatment planning.
  3. identify the factors effecting the Strength of Evidence for the studies included in this Comparative Effectiveness Review.


This 1 credit course is designed for social workers, psychologists, counselors, therapists, nurses and other health care professionals, and is at the intermediate instructional level.

There is no known conflict of interest or commercial support related to this CE program.

Depressive disorders can affect long-term mental and physical health functioning among children and adolescents, including increased risk of suicide. Despite access to several nonpharmacological, pharmacological, and combined treatment options for childhood depression, clinicians contend with sparse evidence and are concerned about harms associated with treatment.
This course summarizes the results of a systematic review to evaluate the efficacy, comparative effectiveness, and moderators of benefits and harms of available nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatments for children and adolescents with a confirmed diagnosis of a depressive disorder (DD)—major depressive disorder (MDD), persistent depressive disorder (previously termed dysthymia) or DD not otherwise specified.

Learning Objectives

After completing this training the professional will be able to:
  1. describe the empirical evidence reviewed in the course article.
  2. outline the findings in the course article in relationship to what is already know about the benefits of various nonpharmacological, pharmacological and combination treatments for children and adolescents with Depressive Disorders.
  3. compile a list of future research needs related to the treatment of depression in children and adolescents.
1 CE credit hours
$5.50   

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This 1 credit course is designed for social workers, psychologists, counselors, therapists, nurses and other health care professionals, and is at the intermediate instructional level.

Dr. Miller and the ICCE receive compensation through the sales of this manual. There is no outside commercial support related to this CE program and no known conflict of interest.

In this manual, significant research findings that form the
foundation of Feedback-Informed Treatment (FIT) are
reviewed and discussed.

Bertolino, B., & Miller, S.D. (Eds.) (2013). The ICCE Feedback Informed Treatment manuals (Volumes 1-6). Chicago, IL: ICCE Press.

Learning Objectives

After completing this training the health care professional will be able to:
  • identify significant research findings regarding factors that impact and do not impact behavioral health outcomes.
  • summarize empirical evidence regarding the impact of therapeutic alliance on psychotherapy outcomes.
  • describe research findings regarding the validity, reliability, feasibility and sensitivity to change of the ORS and SRS.
  • describe factors contributing to expert performance.


This 2 credit course is designed for social workers, psychologists, counselors, therapists, nurses and other health care professionals, and is at the intermediate instructional level.

There is no known conflict of interest or commercial support related to this CE program.

Mindfulness and compassion sound like good qualities for the therapist to bring to treatment of people who have suffered trauma. This course begins by looking at current common therapeutic approaches to trauma. Next, the author outlines specific ways that therapist mindfulness and compassion can and might benefit survivors of trauma. The course concludes with a variety of ways that the therapist can increase mindfulness and compassion in order to better help clients with trauma.

Learning Objectives

After completing this training the professional will:
  • Identify common approaches to trauma.
  • Describe ways that therapist mindfulness and compassion can and might benefit survivors of trauma.
  • Describe ways that therapist mindfulness and compassion can and might benefit survivors of trauma.